1946 – Notorious

★★★★☆ USA. 1h41m. Romance / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Ben Hecht. Cinematography by Ted Tetzlaff. Edited by Theron Warth. Music by Roy Webb. Starring Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Louis Calhern, Leopoldine Konstantin.

In April 1946, Alicia Huberman, the American daughter of a convicted Nazi spy, is recruited by government agent T. R. Devlin to infiltrate an organization of Nazis who have moved to Brazil after World War II. Considered by critics and scholars to mark a watershed for Hitchcock artistically, and to represent a heightened thematic maturity. His biographer, Donald Spoto, writes that “Notorious is in fact Alfred Hitchcock’s first attempt — at the age of forty-six — to bring his talents to the creation of a serious love story, and its story of two men in love with Ingrid Bergman could only have been made at this stage of his life.”

1945 – Spellbound

★★★★☆ USA. 1h51m. Mystery / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Angus MacPhail, Ben Hecht (screenplay) and Hilary Saint George Saunders, Francis Beeding (“The House Of Dr. Edwardes”). Cinematography by George Barnes. Edited by Hal C. Kern. Music by Miklós Rózsa. Starring Gregory Peck, Ingrid Bergman, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll, Rhonda Fleming, John Emery, Norman Lloyd, Bill Goodwin.

The story of the new head of a mental asylum who turns out not to be what he claims. Features a dream sequence by Salvador Dalí.

1949 – Under Capricorn

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h57m. Thriller / Romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by James Bridie (screenplay) and Hume Cronyn (story) and Helen Simpson (“Under Capricorn”) and John Colton, Margaret Linden (“Under Capricorn”). Cinematography by Jack Cardiff. Edited by Bert Bates. Music by Richard Addinsell, Louis Levy. Starring Ingrid Bergman, Joseph Cotten, Michael Wilding, Margaret Leighton, Cecil Parker, Denis O’Dea, Jack Watling.

About a couple in Australia who started out as lady and stable boy in Ireland, and who are now bound together by a horrible secret. Hitchcock’s second film in Technicolor, and like the preceding color film Rope (1948), it also featured 9- and 10-minute long takes.