1959 – North By Northwest

★★★★★ USA. 2h16m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Ernest Lehman. Cinematography Robert Burks. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Jessie Royce, Leo G. Carroll.

A tale of mistaken identity, with an innocent man pursued across the United States by agents of a mysterious organization trying to prevent him from blocking their plan to smuggle out microfilm which contains government secrets. North by Northwest is listed among the canonical Hitchcock films of the 1950s and is often listed among the greatest films of all time.

1976 – Obsession

★★★☆☆ USA. 1h38m. Thriller / Mystery. Directed by Brian De Palma. Written by Paul Schrader (screenplay) and Brian De Palma, Paul Schrader (story). Cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond. Edited by Paul Hirsch. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Cliff Robertson, Geneviève Bujold, John Lithgow, Stocker Fontelieu.

About a New Orleans businessman who is haunted by guilt following the death of his wife and daughter during a kidnapping-rescue attempt gone wrong. Years after the tragedy, he meets and falls in love with a young woman who is the exact look-alike of his long dead wife.

1960 – Psycho

★★★★★ USA. 1h49m. Horror. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Joseph Stefano (screenplay) and Robert Bloch (“Psycho”). Cinematography by John L. Russell. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, John McIntire.

A woman on the run from the police stumbles across a lonely motel run by a psychopath. Considered one of Hitchcock’s best films and praised as a major work of cinematic art by international film critics and scholars due to its slick direction, tense atmosphere, effective camerawork, a memorable score and iconic performances. Often ranked among the greatest films of all time, it set a new level of acceptability for violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films, and is widely considered to be the earliest example of the slasher film genre.

1998 – Psycho

★★☆☆☆ USA. 1h44m. Horror. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Written by Joseph Stefano (screenplay) and Robert Bloch (“Psycho”). Cinematography by Christopher Doyle. Edited by Amy E. Duddleston. Music by Bernard Herrmann, Danny Elfman, Steve Bartek. Starring Anne Heche, Vince Vaughn, Julianne Moore, Viggo Mortensen, William H. Macy.

A modern remake of the 1960 film of the same name directed by Alfred Hitchcock, in which an embezzler arrives at an old motel run by an insane killer named Norman Bates. Both films are adapted from Robert Bloch’s 1959 novel of the same name.

1955 – The Trouble With Harry

★★★★☆ USA. 1h39m. Black Comedy. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by John Michael Hayes (screenplay) and Jack Trevor Story (“The Trouble With Harry”). Cinematography by Robert Burks. Edited by Alma Macrorie. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Edmund Gwenn, John Forsythe, Shirley MacLaine, Mildred Natwick, Mildred Dunnock, Jerry Mathers, Royal Dano.

The action in The Trouble with Harry takes place during a sun-filled autumn in the Vermont countryside. The fall foliage and the beautiful scenery around the village, as well as Bernard Herrmann’s light-filled score, all set an idyllic tone. The story is about how the residents of a small Vermont village react when the dead body of a man named Harry is found on a hillside. The film is, however, not really a murder mystery; it is essentially a romantic comedy with thriller overtones, in which the corpse serves as a Macguffin.

1958 – Vertigo

★★★★★ USA. 2h8m. Thriller / Drama / Romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alec Coppel, Samuel Taylor (screenplay) and Pierre Boileau, Thomas Narcejac (“D’entre les morts”). Cinematography by Robert Burks. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring James Stewart, Kim Novak, Barbara Bel Geddes, Tom Helmore, Henry Jones.

Stars James Stewart as former police detective John “Scottie” Ferguson. Scottie is forced into early retirement because an incident in the line of duty has caused him to develop acrophobia (an extreme fear of heights) and vertigo (a false sense of rotational movement). Scottie is hired by an acquaintance, Gavin Elster, as a private investigator to follow Gavin’s wife Madeleine (Kim Novak), who is behaving strangely.