1930 – Murder!

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h41m. Crime / Mystery. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alfred Hitchcock, Walter Mycroft, Alma Reville (screenplay) and Clemence Dane, Helen Simpson (“Enter Sir John”). Cinematography by J.J. Cox. Edited by Rene Marrison, Emile de Ruelle. Music by John Reynders. Starring Herbert Marshall, Norah Baring, Phyllis Konstam, Edward Chapman, Miles Mander, Esme Percy.

A young actress in a traveling theatre troupe, is found in a daze with blood on her clothes, standing by the murdered body of another young actress. The poker used to commit the murder was at Diana’s feet, but she has no memory of what happened during the minutes the crime was committed.

1959 – North By Northwest

★★★★★ USA. 2h16m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Ernest Lehman. Cinematography Robert Burks. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Jessie Royce, Leo G. Carroll.

A tale of mistaken identity, with an innocent man pursued across the United States by agents of a mysterious organization trying to prevent him from blocking their plan to smuggle out microfilm which contains government secrets. North by Northwest is listed among the canonical Hitchcock films of the 1950s and is often listed among the greatest films of all time.

1946 – Notorious

★★★★☆ USA. 1h41m. Romance / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Ben Hecht. Cinematography by Ted Tetzlaff. Edited by Theron Warth. Music by Roy Webb. Starring Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Louis Calhern, Leopoldine Konstantin.

In April 1946, Alicia Huberman, the American daughter of a convicted Nazi spy, is recruited by government agent T. R. Devlin to infiltrate an organization of Nazis who have moved to Brazil after World War II. Considered by critics and scholars to mark a watershed for Hitchcock artistically, and to represent a heightened thematic maturity. His biographer, Donald Spoto, writes that “Notorious is in fact Alfred Hitchcock’s first attempt — at the age of forty-six — to bring his talents to the creation of a serious love story, and its story of two men in love with Ingrid Bergman could only have been made at this stage of his life.”

1932 – Number Seventeen

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h4m. Thriller / Mystery. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alfred Hitchcock, Alma Reville, Rodney Ackland (screenplay) and Joseph Jefferson Farjeon (“Number Seventeen”). Cinematography by Jack Cox, Bryan Langley. Edited by A.C. Hammond. Music by Adolph Hallis. Starring Leon M. Lion, Anne Grey, John Stuart, Donald Calthrop, Barry Jones, Ann Casson.

A group of criminals who committed a jewel robbery hide their loot in an old house over a railway that leads to the English Channel. An outsider stumbles onto this plot and intervenes with the help of a neighbour who is a police officer’s daughter.

1947 – The Paradine Case

★★★☆☆ USA. 1h54m. Drama / Romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alma Reville, James Bridie, David O. Selznick, Ben Hecht (screenplay) and Robert Hichens (“The Paradine Case”). Cinematography by Lee Garmes. Edited by Hal C. Kern. Music by Franz Waxman, Edward Rebner, Paul Dessau. Starring Gregory Peck, Ann Todd, Alida Valli, Charles Laughton, Charles Coburn, Joan Tetzel, Ethel Barrymore.

Film noir courtroom drama that tells of an English barrister who falls in love with a woman who is accused of murder, and how it affects his relationship with his wife.

1960 – Psycho

★★★★★ USA. 1h49m. Horror. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Joseph Stefano (screenplay) and Robert Bloch (“Psycho”). Cinematography by John L. Russell. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Bernard Herrmann. Starring Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, John McIntire.

A woman on the run from the police stumbles across a lonely motel run by a psychopath. Considered one of Hitchcock’s best films and praised as a major work of cinematic art by international film critics and scholars due to its slick direction, tense atmosphere, effective camerawork, a memorable score and iconic performances. Often ranked among the greatest films of all time, it set a new level of acceptability for violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films, and is widely considered to be the earliest example of the slasher film genre.

1954 – Rear Window

★★★★★ USA. 1h52m. Mystery / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by John Michael Hayes (screenplay) and Cornell Woolrich (“It Had To Be Murder”). Cinematography by Robert Burks. Edited by George Tomasini. Music by Franz Waxman. Starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter, Wendell Corey, Raymond Burr.

A photographer is confined to a wheelchair while he mends a broken leg, and while housebound he begins to spy on his neighbors. This leads him to suspect one of his neighbors has committed murder. Considered by many filmgoers, critics, and scholars to be one of Hitchcock’s best and one of the greatest films ever made.

1940 – Rebecca

★★★★★ USA. 2h10m. Romance / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Robert E. Sherwood, Joan Harrison (screenplay) and Philip MacDonald, Michael Hogan (story) and Daphne du Maurier (“Rebecca”). Cinematography by George Barnes. Edited by W. Donn Hayes. Music by Franz Waxman. Starring Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier, Judith Anderson, George Sanders, Reginald Denny, Gladys Cooper, C. Aubrey Smith, Nigel Bruce.

A gothic tale shot in black-and-white. Maxim de Winter’s first wife Rebecca, who died before the events of the film, is never seen. Her reputation and recollections of her, however, are a constant presence in the lives of Maxim, his new wife and the housekeeper Mrs. Danvers.

Rebecca was theatrically released on April 12, 1940. A critical and commercial success, it received eleven nominations at the 13th Academy Awards, more than any other film that year. It won two awards; Best Picture, and Best Cinematography, becoming the only film directed by Hitchcock to win the former award.

1931 – Rich And Strange

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h23m. Comedy / Romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alfred Hitchcock, Alma Reville, Val Valentine (screenplay) and Dale Collins (“Rich And Strange”). Cinematography by John “Jack” Cox, Charles Martin. Edited by Winifred Cooper, Rene Marrison. Music by Adolph Hallis. Starring Henry Kendall, Joan Barry, Percy Marmont, Betty Amann, Elsie Randolph.

A couple, Fred and Emily Hill, living a mundane middle-class life in London, receive a letter informing them that an uncle will give them, as an advance against their future inheritance, as much money as they need to enjoy themselves in the present. Immediately Fred quits his job as a clerk and they leave on a cruise for “the Orient”.

1927 – The Ring

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h48m. Drama / Romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alfred Hitchcock, Eliot Stannard. Cinematography by Jack E. Cox. Starring Carl Brisson, Lillian Hall-Davis, Ian Hunter, Forrester Harvey, Harry Terry, Gordon Harker.

One of Hitchcock’s nine surviving silent films, The Ring concerns the struggles a fairground boxer has with a mysterious heavyweight contender, especially when the rivalry threatens to end his relationship with his girlfriend.

1948 – Rope

★★★★★ USA. 1h20m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Arthur Laurents (screenplay) and Hume Cronyn (story) and Patrick Hamilton (“Rope”). Cinematography by Joseph A. Valentine, William V. Skall. Edited by William H. Ziegler. Music by David Buttolph, Francis Poulenc, Leo F. Forbstein. Starring James Stewart, John Dall, Farley Granger, Joan Chandler, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Constance Collier, Douglas Dick, Edith Evanson.

The first of Hitchcock’s Technicolor films, and is notable for taking place in real time and being edited so as to appear as a single shot through the use of long takes. It is the second of Hitchcock’s “limited setting” films, the first being Lifeboat. The original play was said to be inspired by the real-life murder of 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924 by University of Chicago students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb.

1936 – Sabotage

★★★★☆ UK. 1h16m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Charles Bennett (screenplay) and Joseph Conrad (“Secret Agent”). Cinematography by Bernard Knowles. Edited by Charles Frend. Music by Jack Beaver. Starring Sylvia Sidney, Oskar Homolka, Desmond Tester, John Loder, Joyce Barbour, Matthew Boulton, S.J. Warmington.

Loosely based on Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel The Secret Agent, about a woman who suspects that her husband, a London cinema owner, is a terrorist agent.

Sabotage should not be confused with Hitchcock’s film Secret Agent, which was also released in 1936, but instead loosely based on two stories in the 1927 collection Ashenden: Or the British Agent by W. Somerset Maugham. It also should not be confused with Hitchcock’s film Saboteur (1942).

1942 – Saboteur

★★★★☆ USA. 1h49m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Peter Viertel, Joan Harrison, Dorothy Parker. Cinematography by Joseph A. Valentine. Edited by Otto Ludwig. Music by Frank Skinner. Starring Robert Cummings, Priscilla Lane, Otto Kruger, Alan Baxter, Clem Bevans, Norman Lloyd, Alma Kruger.

Aircraft factory worker Barry Kane is accused of starting a fire at the Stewart Aircraft Works in Glendale, California — an act of sabotage that killed his friend Mason. Kane believes the real culprit is a man named Fry who, during their efforts to put out the fire, handed him a fire extinguisher filled with gasoline, which he passed on to Mason. When the investigators find no one named “Fry” on the list of plant workers, they assume Kane is the culprit.

1936 – Secret Agent

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h26m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Charles Bennett, Alma Reville, Ian Hay, Jesse Lasky Jr. (screenplay) and Campbell Dixon (“Secret Agent”) and W. Somerset Maugham (story). Cinematography by Bernard Knowles. Edited by Charles Frend. Starring John Gielgud, Madeleine Carroll, Peter Lorre, Robert Young, Percy Marmont, Florence Kahn, Charles Carson, Lilli Palmer.

An author who is also a British captain is asked to undertake a secret mission: to identify and eliminate a German agent on his way to Arabia to stir up trouble in the Middle East. Upon agreeing, he’s given a new identity (Richard Ashenden), a fake death, and the assistance of a killer known variously as “the Hairless Mexican” and “the General” (Lorre), though he’s not bald, Mexican or a general. When “Ashenden” arrives there, he is surprised to find that the secret service has also provided him with an attractive wife

1943 – Shadow Of A Doubt

★★★★☆ USA. 1h48m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson, Alma Reville (screenplay) and Gordon McDonnell (story). Cinematography by Joseph A. Valentine. Edited by Milton Carruth. Music by Dmitri Tiomkin, Franz Lehár. Starring Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten, Macdonald Carey, Henry Travers, Patricia Collinge, Wallace Ford, Hume Cronyn.

A teenage girl begins to suspect that her favorite uncle is a murderer. Hitchcock’s favorite of his own films. Considered by critics to be one of his masterpieces.

1931 – The Skin Game

★★★☆☆ UK. 1h22m. Drama. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Alfred Hitchcock, Alma Reville (screenplay) and John Galsworthy (“The Skin Game”). Cinematography by Jack E. Cox. Edited by A.R. Gobbett, Rene Marrison. Starring Edmund Gwenn, John Longden, Helen Haye, C.V. France, Jill Esmond, Phillis Konstam, Frank Lawton.

Revolves around two rival families, the Hillcrists and the Hornblowers, and the disastrous results of the feud between them.

1945 – Spellbound

★★★★☆ USA. 1h51m. Mystery / Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Angus MacPhail, Ben Hecht (screenplay) and Hilary Saint George Saunders, Francis Beeding (“The House Of Dr. Edwardes”). Cinematography by George Barnes. Edited by Hal C. Kern. Music by Miklós Rózsa. Starring Gregory Peck, Ingrid Bergman, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll, Rhonda Fleming, John Emery, Norman Lloyd, Bill Goodwin.

The story of the new head of a mental asylum who turns out not to be what he claims. Features a dream sequence by Salvador Dalí.

1950 – Stage Fright

★★★★☆ USA / UK. 1h50m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Whitfield Cook, Ranald MacDougall (screenplay) and Alma Reville, James Bridie (story) and Selwyn Jepson (“Man Running”). Cinematography by Wilkie Cooper. Edited by Edward B. Jarvis. Music by Leighton Lucas. Starring Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim, Sybil Thorndike, Kay Walsh, Miles Malleson, Hector MacGregor, Joyce Grenfell, Pat Hitchcock.

Eve Gill (Jane Wyman) is an aspiring actress at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in London. She is interrupted in rehearsal by her friend (and crush), actor Jonathan Cooper (Richard Todd), the secret lover of flamboyant stage actress/singer Charlotte Inwood (Marlene Dietrich). Via a flashback, he says Charlotte visited him after killing her husband; she was wearing a bloodstained dress. Jonathan claims he went back to her house for another dress, but was seen by Nellie Goode (Kay Walsh), Charlotte’s cockney maid/dresser. He escaped the police and needs help.

1951 – Strangers On A Train

★★★★★ USA. 1h41m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Raymond Chandler, Whitfield Cook, Czenzi Ormonde (screenplay) and Patricia Highsmith (“Strangers On A Train”). Cinematography by Robert Burks. Edited by William H. Ziegler. Music by Dmitri Tiomkin. Starring Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, Robert Walker, Leo G. Carroll, Pat Hitchcock, Laura Elliott, Marion Lorne, Jonathan Hale, Howard St. John, John Brown.

Concerns two strangers who meet on a train, a young tennis player and a charming psychopath. The psychopath suggests that because they each want to “get rid” of someone, they should “exchange” murders, and that way neither will be caught. The psychopath commits the first murder, then tries to force the tennis player to complete the bargain.

1941 – Suspicion

★★★★☆ USA. 1h39m. Thriller. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Written by Samson Raphaelson, Joan Harrison, Alma Reville (screenplay) and Francis Iles (“Before The Fact”). Cinematography by Harry Stradling Sr. Edited by William Hamilton. Music by Franz Waxman. Starring Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant, Nigel Bruce, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Dame May Whitty, Isabel Jeans, Heather Angel.

In the film, a shy spinster runs off with a charming playboy, who turns out to be penniless, a gambler, and dishonest in the extreme. She comes to suspect that he is also a murderer, and that he is attempting to kill her.